Review: Cathay Pacific The Bridge Lounge Hong Kong

Introduction
The Qantas Lounge Hong Kong
Cathay Pacific The Cabin Lounge Hong Kong
Cathay Pacific The Wing Business Lounge Hong Kong
Cathay Pacific The Bridge Lounge Hong Kong
W Taipei
Plaza Premium Airport Experience Zone Taipei Taoyuan
Cathay Pacific 405 A330-300 Business Class Taipei to Hong Kong
Cathay Pacific The Arrival Lounge Hong Kong


My last stop was The Bridge, which I saw as one of the better lounges at Hong Kong Airport before this visit. I’ve touched base with this lounge once, and so has Jason, but I wanted to see if the lounge was any different from my last visit in 2015. I wanted to hop on the APM, but it was really crowded, so I ended up walking.

I caught two things – one of them was the sign for the new American flight to Los Angeles (I was actually there a week after the American Hong Kong-Los Angeles inaugural), and the other was a Korean Air 747-8, which I was scheduled to be on from Seoul to Hong Kong.

img_2176 Hong Kong Airport Flight Signage

img_2177Korean Air Boeing 747-8 Hong Kong Airport

I made it past gate 35, the “fork area” of the airport, where the airport forks into gates 41-60 and gates 61-80. The Bridge was dead on in front of me. It wasn’t the first time I’ve taken the walk, but I don’t remember being in as much of a hurry as I was anytime before this…

img_2178 Cathay Pacific The Bridge Lounge Hong Kong Entrance

Keep in mind that The Bridge is a oneworld business class lounge, so apart from status, you can get in the lounge with business class on basically any oneworld carrier.

The entrance to the lounge seems pretty cheap to me, but the nice finishes of the lounge returned to me once I turned left towards The Bistro and the Coffee Loft.

img_2179Cathay Pacific The Bridge Lounge Hong Kong Entrance

I actually wasn’t really adjusted to what I remembered from the lounge, especially with the chaos at The Wing and how tired I was (in case you don’t want to read my rather brief review, The Wing to me is like Rylan to Gary Barlow). I was actually really taken aback by how “homey” The Bridge was – I remembered it as modern, but didn’t remember it to look as stunning. I think it was the combination of a lack of people and the sheer amount of lounges I visited in the middle, including The Pier, what I see as Cathay Pacific’s best lounge.

Once upon turning left were some areas with couches and more seating varieties.

img_2180 Cathay Pacific The Bridge Lounge Hong Kong Seating

img_2186Cathay Pacific The Bridge Lounge Hong Kong Seating

The left side of the lounge features The Bistro, which is one of the two main dining areas in the lounge. The area was completely deserted at the time, and featured table seating and bench seating.

img_2181 Cathay Pacific The Bridge Lounge Hong Kong The Bistro

img_2185 Cathay Pacific The Bridge Lounge Hong Kong The Bistro

The food spread was rather extensive and looked good, though I didn’t have a chance to try it out given that my flight was already boarding.

img_2184 Cathay Pacific The Bridge Lounge Hong Kong The Bistro Food Spread

img_2182 Cathay Pacific The Bridge Lounge Hong Kong The Bistro Food Spread

img_2183Cathay Pacific The Bridge Lounge Hong Kong The Bistro Food Spread

I walked further to The Coffee Loft, which was also deserted. Personally, I’d spend some time here – while I don’t drink coffee, I do like other beverages such as hot chocolate, and they also have smoothies on order, which I really like. Too bad I didn’t have more time to roam around.

img_2187 Cathay Pacific The Bridge Lounge Hong Kong The Coffee Loft

The actual seating was comprised of benches by the side (again, not too sure what the use of that is, given that you can’t really put coffee there comfortably, or do any sort of work), and chairs that you also find at The Wing, which are surprisingly comfortably padded.

img_2188 Cathay Pacific The Bridge Lounge Hong Kong The Coffee Loft

While there are also tarmac views, the blinds were closed, and I didn’t want to destroy anyone’s OCD by opening them, so I didn’t take any tarmac pictures. There are good tarmac views from the lounge, though, but no runway views.

img_2190 Cathay Pacific The Bridge Lounge Hong Kong The Coffee Loft

Behind The Coffee Loft is a business center, which features some desks with printers by the side, some with iMacs and some without. Personally, I think that’s a great setup, as you can take your own equipment and have a comfortable place to work, but if you don’t, there are still iMacs on offer.

img_2189Cathay Pacific The Bridge Lounge Hong Kong Business Center

While I didn’t manage to photograph the shower rooms during my visit this time, they’re really nice – here’s a picture I took during my last visit.

IMG_0604Cathay Pacific The Bridge Lounge Hong Kong Shower Room

I then moved over to the other side of the lounge, as time was running out. This side featured The Long Bar and The Bakery.

img_2192 Cathay Pacific The Bridge Lounge Hong Kong Entrance

really like the shelves – they give the feel of a really modern, designer house, without being particularly “in the way” and also providing privacy between sections.

img_2204Cathay Pacific The Bridge Lounge Hong Kong Seating

There certainly wasn’t a lack of seating variety either. Apart from the armchairs photographed above, they also had Solus chairs, bench seating…

img_2203 Cathay Pacific The Bridge Lounge Hong Kong Solus Chair

img_2202 Cathay Pacific The Bridge Lounge Hong Kong Bench Seating

…as well as the really comfortable L-shaped sofas I remember sitting in with my entire family last time. Ahhh!

img_2200 Cathay Pacific The Bridge Lounge Hong Kong Sofas

img_2199Cathay Pacific The Bridge Lounge Hong Kong Sofas

Unfortunately, The Bakery was really crowded this time round, surprisingly, so I couldn’t really take a good picture. I managed to take a (really blurry) picture of The Bakery last time, so I’ll just repost it here.

IMG_0575Cathay Pacific The Bridge Lounge Hong Kong The Bakery

The food spread was better than I remembered it to be – all the food looked fresher and less “sloppy” – but still didn’t seem very good. For what it’s worth, there are decent noodles here, though there isn’t a dedicated Noodle Bar.

img_2196 Cathay Pacific The Bridge Lounge Hong Kong The Bakery Food Spread

img_2197 Cathay Pacific The Bridge Lounge Hong Kong The Bakery Food Spread

img_2198 Cathay Pacific The Bridge Lounge Hong Kong The Bakery Food Spread

Finally, in addition to everything else, there’s a Long Bar, which serves alcoholic drinks, as well as some really nice mocktails that I didn’t have a chance to try out this time.

img_2201Cathay Pacific The Bridge Lounge Hong Kong Long Bar

At this point in time, I thought it was a good idea to head to the gate, where I caught up with my family and friends heading over from The Pier. I had a good view of a few planes as I walked to the gate, including an El Al 777 and an Air India 787.

img_2205 El Al Boeing 777-200 Hong Kong Airport

img_2207 Air India Boeing 787-8 Hong Kong Airport

Soon we got to our aircraft, which was a 21-year-old 777-200 taking us to Taipei.

img_2209 Cathay Pacific Boeing 777-200 Hong Kong Airport

The actual flight was run-of-the-mill, so I won’t be reviewing it. If you want to see how flying from Hong Kong to Taipei on a 777-200 is like, here’s a review of the exact same route that I flew last June.

The flight was nice, though, and featured regional business class seats in a 2-3-2 configuration. Unfortunately, my friends forgot to reserve their seats, so by giving them the window seat I got a lot of work done in the three seats I had to myself at the bulkhead. I’m actually not sure which option I’d like more…

img_2242 Cathay Pacific Boeing 777-200 Business Class

Another thing about the flight were the mooncakes that were passed out to us, which was a special touch. They tasted pretty good (though I don’t like egg yolk).

img_2244Cathay Pacific Business Class Mooncakes

Bottom Line

Cathay Pacific’s The Bridge actually grew on me during this visit more than any other lounge I visited on the day. I thought that it was nicely designed with understated luxury, ambient, and didn’t seem overcrowded at all.

I still far prefer The Pier and The Qantas Lounge to The Bridge, purely because of size, food offerings (the food offering at this lounge wasn’t actually that good), service and decoration. That said, the lounge still beats all of the Star Alliance options that Hong Kong Airport offers, so I wouldn’t hesitate to spend some time here if I had a load of time to spend in transit at Hong Kong Airport.

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